INTERNATIONALES THEATERINSTITUT / MIME CENTRUM BERLIN

MEDIATHEK

FÜR TANZ

UND THEATER

MCB-DV-408

Hoppla!

Autorenschaft
Beschreibung

VHS-Master steht im Masterarchiv + eine zweite VHS (schlechtere Qualität).

Der Film basiert auf zwei Choreographien von Keersmaeker: "Mikrokosmos" (7 pieces for 2 pianos, performed by Walter Hus & Stefan Poelmans) und "Quatuor nr. 4" (performed by Mondriaan Kwartet).

In the film "Hoppla!" made by Wolfgang Kolb, two choreographies by Anne Teresa de Keersmeaker are brought togetjer and performed to the music of the Hungarian composer Bela Bartók: Mikrokosmos, seven short works for two pianos and Quatuor nr.4, Bartok´s lfourth string quartet. The reading room of the University of Ghent library, designed by the famous Belgian arichtect Henry van de Velde (1863-1957), served as location.
During filming the music was performed by the pianists Walter Hus and Stefan Poelmans on the one hand and by the Netherlands Mondiraan Quartet on the other. Mikrokosmos is a "pas de deux": for the first tima a male dancer makes his entry into Anne Teresa de Keersmaeker´s universe. Four girls/women dancers perform to the string quartet. In van de Velde´s open space lit by large windows the black clothing of the dancers sharply outlines their movements.
One senses an immense complicity between the musicians and the dancers: the exhilaration of playing music together and dancing simultaneously is as it were the artistic motor of this project. In Hoppla!, Bartókßs dansant music, De Keersmaeker inventinve coreography, van de Velde´s austere space, and Wolfgang Kolbßs dynamic editing are equally merged into onoe enormous convincing composition: therefore Hoppla! can be rightfully considered to be one of the milestones of the, still in its infancy, video-dance genre.

Gruppe / Compagnie / Ensemble
Choreographie
Darsteller
Johanne Saunier, Jean-Luc Ducourt, Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker, Nadine Ganase, Roxane Huilmand, Fumiyo Ikeda
Standorte
MCB
Aufnahmedatum
1989
Land
BE
Kamera
Remon Fromont, Philippe Guilbert, Philippe Meandly
Länge
52 min